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150 Heavy Duty Clear Plastic Cutlery (50 Fork, 50 Knives, and 50 Spoons)
£5.69

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150 Heavy Duty Clear Plastic Cutlery (50 Fork, 50 Knives, and 50 Spoons) by Royal Markets Disposable Cutlery

  • Clear heavy duty plastic cutlery 150 Pieces
  • Each packet contains - 50 Knives, 50 Forks and 50 Spoons
  • Strong and durable by Royal Markets

Mountain Warehouse Ice Pack - 17cm X 8.8cm X 3.5cm Reuseable Ice Bag, 2 Per Packet Cold Pack, Ready to Use Cold Compress - For Use with insulated Cool Bags & Chilly Bins Blue
£3.99
Mountain Warehouse Ice Pack - 17cm X 8.8cm X 3.5cm Reuseable Ice Bag, 2 Per Packet Cold Pack, Ready to Use Cold Compress - For Use with insulated Cool Bags & Chilly Bins Blue by Mountain Warehouse

  • 2 pack - Value for money, ideal to keep as spares
  • Freeze for 24 hours - Provides relief, compression and is easy to use
  • Use with cool bag - For added convenience, keeps food & drink cool

InterDesign Linus Expandable Cutlery Tray, 2-Compartment Drawer Dividers for Cutlery and Kitchen Utensils, Made of BPA-Free Plastic, Clear
£12.99

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InterDesign Linus Expandable Cutlery Tray, 2-Compartment Drawer Dividers for Cutlery and Kitchen Utensils, Made of BPA-Free Plastic, Clear by InterDesign

  • The dimensions of the drawer organiser are 15.2 cm x 30.5 cm x 6.4...
  • This kitchen accessories and utensil holder is made of sturdy,...
  • The storage tray is not only ideal for cutlery in the kitchen:...

20 PACK - PAPER POCKET TISSUE - Soft 3 Ply handbag tissues FREE DELIVERY
£4.99
20 PACK - PAPER POCKET TISSUE - Soft 3 Ply handbag tissues FREE DELIVERY by Party & Paper Solutions

  • 10 tissues per packet 21cm x 21cm approx.
  • See our store for matching, plates, bowls, cups, tablecovers,...
  • Great for travel, Luxury soft touch

Durable Coffee Point Caddy Cutlery Tray Drawer Insert Storage Box Waste container
£12.75

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Durable Coffee Point Caddy Cutlery Tray Drawer Insert Storage Box Waste container by Durable

  • Used for milk cartons, sugar packets, tea bags and stirrers
  • Dishwasher-safe and easy to clean
  • Made from high-quality plastic

Press Office Cafe reviewed - Myanmar Times

Downstage, frosted glass runs knee-high the width of the stage, to shade from audience view the knees of any sitting at six tall wooden stools along a counter. Further upstage: wooden tables, seating two or four (note: grouped tables must be separable into pairs during the course of the performance, to accommodate those without a place). On each table sits: one (1) re-purposed Lyle’s Golden Syrup tin containing sugar packets. one (1) glass with folded paper napkins. one (1) small jar, roughly mustard-sized, containing three to four (3-4) purple and white flowers in water. Electrical outlets must be located behind each table (these must be used by someone at least once per performance to charge devices). Walls – white, sparsely decorated. Think “gallery space”. From tracks in the ceiling hang bare round yellow bulbs, rather than fluorescent illumination. paintings, in indiscriminate states of completion, rest on an easel and shelf in corner near painting supplies, books and magazines. Paintings by local artists as well as framed retro prints (for instance, vintage typewriter advertisements) are hung (exact arrangements should vary between performances, suggesting engagement in charity fundraisers and other community initiatives). Upstage, the upper end of a staircase cues audience we are not on the ground floor. From “below”, occasional sounds of soft clatter emerge: cutlery, the whir of a blender, a storage cupboard door swinging closed. This suggests coffee shop commerce but keeps it at a remove – focus is solely on-stage, on the actors and what they are doing whether separately or together. Dialogue – in English and/or Myanmar – should be improvised, though certain themes can recur. Discussions should be of the kind that would be carried out knowing that everyone else in the room can hear but that no one will make it obvious they’re listening. If a character makes, or receives, a mobile phone call, the audience should come to intuit from the discussion that this neighbourhood is Yangon’s hippest, Yaw Min Gyi, without it being made explicit on this end. Cast must differ with each performance, but must include examples of most, if not all, the following types: multiple YOUNG WHITE FEMALES WITH SUNDRESSES, some carrying belongings in fair-trade hemp bags. a MYANMAR-AND-FOREIGNER duo, discussing democracy initiatives. a local HANDPHONE COUPLE, pecking separately away at their mobiles but sometimes murmuring. Source: www.mmtimes.com

Happy berth days - The Hindu

“Cubed potatoes parboiled and lightly sautéed in mustard oil with a tempering of nigella (kala jeera) and green chillies. Sometimes, my grandmother would throw in a handful of fresh peas. This was paired with creamy white maida luchi. This was the 'railer tarkari' that has fed my family in trains since the 1930s. The fresh green chillies and peas added to the flavour and crunch. Grandmother would add salt and a wee bit of sugar as well, and leave the dish covered and simmering. ” Mohua Mitra shares this glorious family tradition in response to my message about the puri alu that I packed for my son’s 48-hour train journey. Deepali Das pitches in and says the sukka mutton dish is forever referred to as railway mutton in her family. She continues, “Then there was the bhararwa bhindi and karare alu that was sent to the pantry to be warmed up. There were at least three kinds of pickles. Long journeys were common as we crisscrossed from Calcutta to Madras, or to Patiala or Jamnagar, when we were growing up. And, going by the comments, it is obvious that eating on the train was a big part of those journeys. Nanhi Mann remembers, “Barely had the train pulled out of the station, there was a chorus of ‘Mummy, bhook lagi hai ’ (We are hungry). The alu parathas were the first to be demolished. They were packed in a waxed paper with tilted orange and blue squares on them. If it was summer, cucumbers were peeled then and there. We unwrapped little paper packets with salt and pepper, sprinkled them on the cucumber and polished them off. ” Or there were sandwiches. Remember the bread and butter and bottles of jam and sauce. (I don’t think they had sachets then). Newspaper was spread out on the seat, bread unwrapped, spoons and butter knives wiped clean with napkins, followed by the exciting ritual of sandwich-making. Sometimes, we bought boiled eggs from the platform vendors. “We had parathas and onion-stuffed karelas on our 36-hour trips to Ludhiana,” says Neeta. “They were guaranteed to last. We also had sweet parathas made with ghee, milk and sugar. ” Inderpreet Kaur remembers that the dough was kneaded with milk and the parathas were wrapped in muslin to keep fresh and soft. “Our first meal was chicken or mutton masala with the ajwain parathas,” she recalls. “And every meal was washed down with station chai. From the south Indian households came the puliodarai and curd rice. So that it wouldn’t sour, rice was mixed well. Source: www.thehindu.com

Cooks and Memsahibs: The mistress-slave syndrome in 20th century Indian ... - Scroll.in

In a long and distinguished career as a diplomatic wife, my mother’s secret weapon was her cook. She had no idea when she set sail for the first time to Europe in 1949 that she would be setting a trend for future Indian diplomatic families to follow. My dad was amongst the first to set the template for what would become the Indian Foreign Service. They travelled on a cargo ship named “Port Said” that would take 40 days to sail from Bombay to Genoa. Accompanying her were her two small children, my sister and myself, enough baggage to last a siege of three years and a cook. In those days travelling abroad was like going into exile. People sailed by ship across oceans. There was very little chance of returning home in between. Letters were exchanged by what was known as the diplomatic bag, sent via New Delhi. It was a life sentence. Man for all seasons. Our cook was code-named the Count of Monte Cristo. He was a young man from the French enclave of Mahe, now known as Mayazhi in North Malabar. He was very personable with a thin pencil moustache and waves of oleaginous hair slicked down with coconut oil. When it became cold, the coconut oil would congeal in white slicks across his head and make him look like a distinguished elder statesman. From the very outset he let it be known that he was the actual representative of the Indian government and that we were his dependents. This was true in a certain sense of the word. Once she had settled down my mother realised that her job description was to be a hotelier and hostess in a strange and alien land. The Count was her man for all seasons. Not only did the Count have to shop, cook and cater to the many distinguished Indian visitors who travelled on delegations to Paris, he had to adapt himself to procuring food items that might substitute for their original ingredients. Being a South Indian, one of the necessities was to procure fresh coconut in sufficient quantities to make coconut milk. My mother and the Count hit upon using kilos of dry desiccated coconut flakes used in bakeries and squeezing the milk out from it to make the batter for appams. Of course,the Count also had to use the traditional stone mortar to grind the rice batter for idlis, the flat stone mortar to make the silky paste for fish curries and an even heavier steel pestle to knock the dry spices into powder. There were no mixies in those days. Source: scroll.in

Latest News

  • 11 Simple Hacks to Make Your Picnic Shine

    07/15/15 ,via Money Talks News (blog)

    Run the handle of the cutlery along the fold, then clip the tip with a clothes pin. “Everyone will have their self-contained Use those extra salt and pepper packets from fast-food restaurants, they are perfect for picnics. Alternatively, fill

  • Press Office Cafe reviewed

    07/17/15 ,via Myanmar Times

    On each table sits: one (1) re-purposed Lyle's Golden Syrup tin containing sugar packets; one (1) glass with folded paper napkins; one (1) small jar, roughly mustard-sized, containing three to four (3-4) purple and white flowers in water. Electrical

  • Happy berth days

    07/03/15 ,via The Hindu

    We unwrapped little paper packets with salt and pepper, sprinkled them on the cucumber and polished them off.” Or there were sandwiches. Remember the bread and butter and bottles of jam and sauce? Meals were served in style with proper shining

  • Cooks and Memsahibs: The mistress-slave syndrome in 20th century Indian ...

    06/30/15 ,via Scroll.in

    It was also the name of a cleaning agent, so most often the Count would turn up with packets of washing powder, which would send my mother into hysterics. Just as each time she asked for agneau or baby goat as it was known in French, the She could

  • Is Compostable Cutlery Really Breaking Down?

    Judy Adams is shopping for cutlery at Whole Foods in Sacramento. She compares two packets of disposable forks. One is made out of recycled plastic. The other is made out of corn starch. “Compostable versus recyclable? What does that mean? Where does 

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plastic cutlery packets | eBay

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Choice Black Plastic Cutlery Pack with Napkin and Salt and ...

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Disposable Cutlery & Plastic Silverware | Staples®

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